Monthly Archives: August 2012

Seth MacFarlane, superman

I’m still in a daze after seeing Seth MacFarlane take Ronnie Scott’s by storm last night, with a little help from the house orchestra. It was just about a perfect package: classy singing (much punchier than on his newly-released album), … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Up the ladder

Echoes of Michael Young… The ever-readable Ta Nehisi-Coates — outsider turned insider, almost —  reflects on status and self-interest: I’m making my way through Chris Hayes’ astounding “Twilight of The Elites”, one of those rare books that originates from a … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Down the ladder

And class raises its head in the new Zadie Smith too. Ron Charles reviews a “brilliant” novel in the Washington Post: As the story unfolds, we learn that Leah and the ragged woman in her hallway were raised in the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Worth adapting

Philip Hensher on the novels that deserve to be rediscovered by TV drama producers. Good to see Sam Selvon’s “The Lonely Londoners” making the list — it’s a terrific snapshot  of the Windrush era. (On a par with Colin MacInnes’s … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Disability today, disability yesterday

Fine Indy column by C4 Paralympics presenter Alex Brooker: When I see someone in a wheelchair, even I do a double-take. And as someone who has a prosthetic leg, when I see someone not wearing their legs I think “Oh … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Headline of the week?

The Borowitz Report has to be a contender: “Romney Hailed as Regular Guy by Woman with Horse in Olympics”. Class war, yes, but the rest of the dispatch is still funny: In a small flub that many delegates found endearing, Mrs. … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

More car crash music

Yet another song I had to ban from my iPod while driving in Corsica. And, yes, it’s Serge again. “Ford Mustang” has to be one of the quintessential records of the Sixties; you can just imagine hipsters putting the vinyl … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Telecommuting, still The Next Big Thing

Pete Hoskin’s thoughtful essay on the pros and cons of home-working. I trust he had his clothes on when he wrote it…

Posted in Uncategorized

“Making rhetoric sound clever”

One of the pieces I missed while I was on holiday was Daniel McCarthy’s post on the decline and fall of America’s conservative intellectual movement: “Conservative” once signified an intellectual tendency with partisan overtones, now it signifies a partisan tendency … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Women in politics, 1959-style

The FT’s Chris Cook unearths a cutting from the days of Supermac. The one about SuperDenis is almost as eloquent. As for poor Daphne’s hopes of a gay marriage, no chance: Tony Curtis has spoken.

Posted in Uncategorized