Monthly Archives: February 2013

Romans

Amidst the relics, on a half-term visit to the Ashmolean, Oxford.

Posted in Uncategorized

Class

I’ve spent much of the past week mentally re-living Ahmad Jamal’s performance at the Barbican– easily one of the most enthralling nights I’ve experienced in a concert hall.  Is there a hipper octogenarian anywhere on the planet? I gave the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

The future of newspapers

How it all looked in 1981, when you needed to set aside two hours to download that day’s edition. Note the caption beneath one of the talking heads: “Owns Home Computer”. [Via Tom McLaughlin]

Posted in Uncategorized

Notebook

Then at eight o’clock the council gardener turned up: Inspection to see whether the garden has been weeded. I show him that everything has been cut; he reaches for something on the ground: “There are still weeds here — and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Fighting by remote-control

Troubling… The New Yorker’s Dexter Filkins on what we know – and what we don’t know – about the effectiveness of drone attacks.

Posted in Uncategorized

The piano is dead, long live the piano

No more noodling in the parlour: the real market is now in the East, apparently. Michael White bids farewell in the Telegraph: Most pianos now come from Japan and China; and in China there’s a keyboard boom much like our … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Thames mist

Image | Posted on by

Notebook

But Mahler! – poor Mahler! He was thin and nervous and sensitive, trembling to all music. It was always that he wanted and sought endlessly for perfection. He forgot that there is no perfection in this world. In his own mind … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Transatlantic Sessions

It’s that time of the year again, thankfully. Eric Bibb is one of the guests this time. My review of the Festival Hall show is here [£].  Another highlight of the evening, without a doubt, was Mary Chapin Carpenter’s song … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized

Notebook

The divisiveness of the new ideologies could turn brothers into faceless strangers and trade unionists or shop owners into class enemies. Normal human instincts were overridden. In the tense spring of 1936, on his way to Madrid University, Julián Marías, … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized