Monthly Archives: April 2014

De Niro: the director’s cut

Bob makes his first-ever Vine. Play it over and over, and  it’s almost like he’s rehearsing a scene. (Shame it’s not as spontaneous as it seems: his “co-star” is apparently a Vine VIP-cum-hoaxer called Jerome Jarre.) Still fun though. After I’d played … Continue reading

Posted in Comedy, Film, Technology | Tagged , ,

If only

One of my favourite comedy sketches (listen here). Kenneth Williams reflects on  what might have been, with a little help from Fenella Fielding. From the “Pieces of Eight” revue, 1959. Written by an up-and-coming young comic called Peter Cook.

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Are you an intolerable intellectual?

I took the test and only scored 8 out of 50. What a relief. [HT: Amanda Vickery]

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Country girls

Simple but beautiful. The Haden Triplets  (Charlie Haden’s daughters) drop into the NPR offices.

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On Wall Street

I’m really looking forward to reading Michael Lewis’s latest, “Flash Boys”. Here he is, talking to the New Republic’s Isaac Chotiner: IC: I was wondering how spending so much time with Wall Street people and on Wall Street has changed you ideologically. … Continue reading

Posted in Economics, Film, Money, US politics | Tagged , , ,

The view from my bike

Suddenly, it almost feels like summer.

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Notebook

It is curious how reluctant we are to include acquisitiveness among the defining characteristics of the age which formed our aesthetic heritage. A competitive urge to acquire was a precondition for the growth in production of lavishly expensive works of art. A … Continue reading

Posted in Art, History, Notebook | Tagged ,

Legerdemain

[Via Althouse]

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Jogo bonito

The elevated highway in São Paulo that’s closed on Sundays to allow people to play the beautiful game. From Christopher Pillitz’s superb set of photos on football in Brazil.

Posted in Brazil, Photography, Sport | Tagged , ,

In search of John Updike

“He began as a prodigy… and he somehow remained one.”  Louis Menand reviews Adam Begley’s new biography: Like many people who grew up in straitened circumstances in the nineteen-thirties and became financially comfortable in the decades after the war, Updike had … Continue reading

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